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  • The dinner list

    by Serle, Rebecca,

    October 15, 2018

    It’s a psychological exercise. It’s also a way to find out more about another person, or simply a jumping off point for a discussion among friends. But even if you’ve never created a list, almost everyone, at some point, has been asked to name the five people, living or dead, who they would invite to dinner if they could invite anyone. In her latest novel, Rebecca Serle follows Sabrina Nielsen, a young woman who shows up for her 30th birthday dinner and finds the people on her list seated at the table. It makes for an interesting evening and a marvelous read.

    Sabrina made the list... Read Full Review

  • The Black God's Drums

    by Clark, P. Djeli.

    October 7, 2018

    Call Number: SF

    Creeper has lived on the streets of New Orleans since her mother died when Creeper was eight years-old.  At thirteen, she does OK for herself, although life is always hard and there is never enough to eat. And then she hears a group of Confederates plotting about kidnapping a Haitian scientist and stealing his mysterious weapon called the Black God’s Drums. This information could be valuable--valuable enough to get Creeper what she really desires: a position on the airship Midnight Robber and a chance to leave New Orleans and start a new life. But this will only happen if Creeper can... Read Full Review

  • The Anchoress

    by Cadwallader, Robyn,

    October 1, 2018

    At age seventeen, Sarah asks to be sealed into a windowless cell for the rest of her life. Why would someone do such a thing, especially at such a young age?

    Sarah is an anchoress, a holy woman who spends her days in prayer and gives spiritual advice to the women of her 11th century English village. Sarah hopes to follow in the footsteps of the previous anchoress, who the villagers claim was so holy that she didn’t even need food or water to survive. As soon as the door is nailed shut, Sarah swallows her fear and throws herself into the life of an ascetic, denying herself any... Read Full Review

  • A Study in Honor

    by O'Dell, Claire,

    September 24, 2018

    Sherlock Holmes is the world’s best known, and possibly most popular, detective. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published the first Sherlock Holmes story, “A Study in Scarlet,” in 1887. Over the next forty years, Doyle went on to write fifty-five additional short stories and four novels about Holmes and his faithful companion, Dr. John Watson.

    Holmes and Watson have become icons for both Great Britain and the mystery genre, and their adventures did not end when Doyle stopped writing. The characters have provided a type of playground for other writers shortly after the publication of the... Read Full Review

  • Never Anyone but You

    by Thomson, Rupert,

    Reviewed by: Robert Anderson, Librarian, Literature & Fiction Department

    September 17, 2018

    Paris in the 1920s:  for Americans this phrase tends to evoke the U.S. expatriates who spent time there, including Gertrude Stein, Hemingway, and Fitzgerald.  But most of the people who created the magical atmosphere that attracted all those foreigners were, of course, French natives.  Rupert Thomson's tenth novel is a fictionalized portrait of two real-life Frenchwomen who participated in the artistic life of that place and time, and went on to play an equally significant part in the resistance to Nazi occupation.

    The central characters of this story--Lucie Schwob and... Read Full Review

  • The Philosopher's Flight

    by Miller, Tom, 1980-

    Reviewed by: Andrea Borchert, Librarian, Science, Technology & Patents Department

    September 4, 2018

     

    Is there any magic power more wished for than flight? Robert “Boober” Weekes dreams of it. Not just of flying, but of being one of the bravest, best flyers in the world; a member of the Rescue and Evacuation Department of the U.S.Sigirly Corps. These flyers use magic sigils (inscribed or painted symbols that may have magical powers) to swoop into dangerous situations and save people. But no man has ever flown with Rescue and Evacuation. Even with a war going on, almost everyone is certain that neither Robert, nor any other man, will ever be strong enough for the job... Read Full Review

  • A Gentleman's Murder.

    by Huang, Christopher.

    August 27, 2018

    Call Number: M

    In Great Britain, the years immediately following WWI were a period of great change. New technologies were finding their way into people’s everyday lives. Women began to voice their dissatisfaction with being essentially second class citizens and unable to vote. And the men who survived serving in WWI returned to their homes scarred from the experience, both physically and psychologically. It is during this tumultuous time that debut author Christopher Huang sets his compelling new mystery: A Gentleman’s Murder.

    The year is 1924, six years after Armistice Day and the end of... Read Full Review

  • Quackery : a brief history of the worst ways to cure everything

    by Kang, Lydia,

    Reviewed by: Andrea Borchert, Librarian, Science, Technology & Patents Department

    August 20, 2018

    Call Number: 614.26 K163

    The history of medicine is not pretty. However, if you are in the right mood and frame of mind, it can be pretty funny. Over the years people have tried some wild things to make themselves feel better, and Quackery: a brief history of the worst ways to cure everything grants us a closer look at some of those treatments and times, from ancient Greece through the age of disco. This whirlwind tour of medical history includes tapeworm diets, mercury treatments for syphilis, electric brushes for baldness, the starvation diet of ... Read Full Review

  • Meet Me at the Museum

    by Youngson, Anne.

    August 13, 2018

    A woman, who has worked on a farm in Bury St. Edmunds, England for her entire adult life, has dreamed for decades of visiting the Silkeborg Museum in Denmark with her best friend to see The Tollund Man, a naturally preserved mummy discovered in a peat bog. When her friend dies, she sends a grief and regret-filled letter to the museum, which is answered, cautiously, and a bit clumsily, by one of the museum’s curators. Over the course of the following year, the two develop a regular correspondence through which they forge a connection and friendship upon which both will come to rely.

    ... Read Full Review

  • Identical strangers : a memoir of twins separated and reunited

    by Schein, Elyse, 1968-

    Reviewed by: David B., Librarian, InfoNow

    August 6, 2018

    Call Number: 392.3 S319

    Identical twins have been a source of endless fascination for millennia. Two people who seem to share a mind, with the exact same DNA, can occupy different bodies. Many twins have such an intimate bond that they seem to read other’s thoughts and communicate in a special language. Their bond is much stronger than other siblings, having spent nine months together before birth. As identical twins age, they tend to have similar IQs, heights, and tastes. However, they may develop different skin conditions and allergies as a response to variable environmental factors. In rare cases, identical... Read Full Review

  • The word is murder : a novel

    by Horowitz, Anthony, 1955-

    Reviewed by: Llyr Heller, Librarian, Teen'Scape

    July 30, 2018

    Call Number: M

    Anthony Horowitz is a multi-talented, prolific and clever writer, with numerous television series to his credit, many seen on public television; even more book series, (Alex Rider and The Diamond Brothers, to name two); and has become part of the James Bond franchise, writing new 007 novels. However, he has done something rather smashing, by embedding himself, as Anthony Horowitz the writer, into this recent murder mystery.

    A woman plans her own funeral, but is murdered shortly afterwards. The consulting ex-detective on the... Read Full Review

  • Deep Roots

    by Emrys, Ruthanna.

    July 23, 2018

    In recent years H.P. Lovecraft and his works have become increasingly problematic. His personal views on race permeate his stories resulting in fiction that is, at best, challenging to enjoy for many readers. As a result, there currently tend to be three approaches regarding Lovecraft’s fiction: those who love it, those who hate it, and those who choose simply not to read it. But there is now a fourth group of readers that is developing: those that are fascinated with the works of authors like Ruthanna Emrys, who use Lovecraft’s mythos as jumping-off points to create incredibly thoughtful... Read Full Review

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